AI THERAPISTS ARE NO LONGER AN IMPOSSIBILITY!

Millennia Chakraborty

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Establishing a relationship between artificial intelligence and emotions in machines or robots is definitely one of the challenging jobs. Focusing on the elements of emotions that can be transformed as per a computer coding is the first step that we can take to make the next gen advancement possible. If we are able to gather necessary components from cognitive science, we can actually make an AI therapist for real. Well, the mental health is a concern among many and if we take a close look at the number of people affected in a given population, it is surely going to be huge. Thus, if we can actually make this happen, we can afford people getting diagnosed and cured as soon as possible moreover, at a much early stage.

Asocial VS Antisocial: Apathetic or Antagonist?

Aditi Rastogi

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“Antisocial”- a word that is thrown around a lot lately. Whenever we see a person too engrossed in a book and they seem unapproachable, we classify them as an introvert which sometimes automatically gets translated to being antisocial. Can you relate to the times when your friend canceled an exciting day out that you have been eagerly waiting for? Were they antisocial?

Can Smiling Make You Happy? – an exploration of Facial Feedback Hypothesis

Aditi Rastogi

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“Sometimes your joy is the source of your smile, but sometimes your smile can be the source of your joy”

This quote by Thich Nhat Hanh, aptly explains the concept of the facial feedback hypothesis. What if I were to tell you that, the facial expressions you made, actually affects the emotions you experience? Sounds absurd, doesn’t it? So, if you continue to smile for a prolonged time, for no apparent reason, then would that make you feel happy?

Subliminal messages are typical Advertising Propaganda!

Millennia Chakraborty

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We often remember a certain situation or an incident that happened amidst a lot of other events quite vaguely. Something like the way you feel when you are anesthetized by a doctor. The deeper part of our mind perceives only the simpler parts of the incident and filters out the rest eventually. Thus, you often remember only one voice out of many in a crowded room. The deeper part of our mind here is what we denote as the unconscious mind. Therefore, when we are anesthetized and still feel like an incident took place but unsure for real, that tells that our mind registered it without any sort of awareness. Since we weren’t aware, we tend to remember it as vaguely as possible. We are simply unable to make sense while narrating exactly the things we visualize in our minds. This is termed as the subliminal perception by psychologists.

False memories – a Glitch or a Mismatch?

Millennia Chakraborty

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Can you relate to the times when you find yourself indulged in an argument with someone who witnessed the same event as you, but somehow the details just don’t match? Even if someone tells you that you’ve got it all wrong, you wouldn’t admit it. You’re just absolutely convinced of what you remember! Later on, you have no choice but to believe that maybe you are the person out there who’s got the facts wrong. Well, this is something quite frequent because according to a lot of researches, “human memories are imperfect”. From this, we can conclude that our minds cannot be trusted, because memories can be altered at any point in time, and more importantly, by anyone.

Psycholinguistics - The Psychology of Language Learning: An Overview

Aditi Rastogi

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Ever wondered how a tiny baby goes from babbling and cooing in sing-song voices to stringing words together to make a powerful sentence? It is certainly a miraculous stage, when a child takes their first words, trying to copy your mouth movements to say “dada.” But how much do they understand, and where is it that they acquire this language? Psycholinguistics and neurolinguistics try to answer many questions like these.